And now we wait

Here we are again. As I mentioned last time, I was making the final changes to my book – the ones that actually needed to be made. Those are now done (for the moment) and I spent the weekend searching for agents, creating a spreadsheet and finalising a synopsis.

Again, I could have spent weeks and months tinkering with these but that beats the point. I sent enquiries to five agents on Monday and now I’m playing the waiting game. It’s my least favourite game. Ever.

It needs to be done, though, so until then I better find ways to pass the hours (and boredom).

Catching up on, well, everything

I’ve spent a lot of my free time over the last two years working on the book. I’ve balanced it with work and seeing friends and family at various places and events.

What I’ve missed out on are games, books and TV shows. So, while I’m waiting for responses and getting myself ready to start the next project, I’ll be playing catch up (and not feeling guilty about doing so).

I’m up to date on Game of Thrones, at least!

There are games I started and never finished – and others I never even started – and there is a mahoosive pile of books to read that glare at me whenever I don’t pick one up. Seriously, it’s a little creepy at times.

I don’t have a job yet, although I’ll start looking for one shortly, and I’m enjoying the downtime right now. My batteries are getting close to full for the first time in ages! Until I get back into a normal routine again, I’m going to enjoy this.

Oh, and…

A writing challenge!

After discussions with other writers, I’ve decided on something to do over the next month or so. Starting next Monday, I’m going to write some short stories, one each day (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday etc). I’d better get those random thoughts and ideas together this week!

However, that’s not going to keep me going long…only one week!

The following three weeks, I’m going to edit those stories on the same day I wrote them – so the following three Mondays I’ll edit the story I wrote on the first Monday. The same for Tuesday, Wednesday etc.

By the end of four weeks, I should have seven stories which are looking pretty sharp. If I get a job by then, it’ll be harder but I’ve missed the shorts and think this will be a good way to get back to them.

I’ll keep you posted on how it goes over the next few weeks!

Making Sacrifices

I’ve been quiet again. Sorry. Not really, though. Those of you in the know will be aware of how hard early October is for me. That’s not the reason though. Well, not entirely.

The last five weeks or so, I’ve been working on redrafting my novel. It’s been difficult, especially to get into the swing of things. Now that I have, work is progressing at a decent pace but the problem is, it’s taken a lot (read: most) of my time. That, and work – and travelling to work – is a bit of a killer. It means I’ve had to make some tough choices.

Beyond the birthday plans, it means cutting back on social events, gaming and even swimming (I’m annoyed about this one the most!). As such, I’ve missed Halloween and all the fun parties and gatherings.

It’ll be worth it.

Editing is not easy. At all

To edit effectively, all distractions need to vanish. I’ve got the TV on but on shows and movies that I’ve seen many times before. It’s the noise I want. Working in silence doesn’t appeal to me.

I need to be objective and, at times, brutal. Some pages are covered in red ink while others have only a few corrections. It’s weird, going through three pages you think actually work well and don’t need many amends (this time around) but then you read eight pages that have so many changes it might have been easier to just rewrite them from scratch.

I exaggerate but hopefully you get the point.

Thankfully, I’ve been editing projects, both creative writing and marketing focused, for the last ten years or so. If all goes to plan, I’ll be working on the digital file by the 12th November.

The sacrifices

As mentioned, gaming has gone out of the window (despite having plenty of games to play!). I’ve turned down a lot of plans with people. Partly due to money but also because they’re a distraction and if I break the run I’m on, it could take even longer to get it done.

Swimming has gone as well. There was an injury followed by illness and now this. It’s been about six weeks since my last swim and I’m suffering withdrawal! I know that I’ll lose some of the fitness and progress made over the last five months but I’ll get it back. By then, I might be able to step it up and do something else. Maybe I can start running a little.

Forgive me

If I’m quiet, or distant, or constantly saying no to your plans to do something, give me a little time. It might seem like I don’t care but I do – possibly too much – just about my writing right now. It does take priority. If I did this full-time, it would be different.

We’ll get through it. Maybe I’ll appreciate these activities more once I can do them again. If it helps me publish this book, it’ll definitely be worth it.

How No Man’s Sky Helps Me as a Writer

No Man's Sky

No Man’s Sky

Another tangent this time but this one, arguably, has more of a relevance to my writing than the Pokémon Go post two weeks ago. This time, I want to discuss No Man’s Sky, a game I have been looking forward to for many years.

I generally avoid reviews and critics on most things. If I come across something, I won’t run away screaming but I will treat it objectively – I’d rather make my own mind up, even if it’s not ‘popular’ opinion. It goes for games, films, TV shows, books, music – everything. That’s why, even though a lot of people seem to be complaining about No Man’s Sky, it doesn’t bother me. There are specific reasons I want the game beyond just enjoying it for what it is. I want to go into these shortly.

First though, I’ll address some of the elephants in the blog post.

It’s not perfect, by any means

Let’s get this straight right now. This is not the best game in the world, probably not even close. The crafting system is limited, the interface clunky (at least on the PS4) and the lack of direction can be off-putting for some people. There’s also very little in the way of tutorial, you’ve got to try things for yourself and learn as you go.

Look too closely at the graphics and they’re not as impressive as you first thought. The game is very grind-heavy and repetitive, you’ll be doing similar things on each world you come across as you follow the very loose objectives you do actually have.

But, for me, a game doesn’t have to be perfect. It’s about overcoming the problems and still succeeding, finding solutions that give the best returns and being inspired. The planets I’ve come across have been awe-inspiring. Standing at the top of a cliff and looking out over the plains with water in the distance. Others are harsh and barren but make me work faster to survive and move on.

As a writer, it has already been a big help

One of the nicer planet's I've found on No Man's Sky

One of the nicer planet’s I’ve found on No Man’s Sky

Now, I’m not just a sci-fi writer, and most of my stories don’t resolve around a being alone and fighting for survival on empty worlds but that doesn’t matter.

The scenery, as I’ve mentioned before, can be great at helping me find the perfect setting for a scene or story. It might only be a small part of it, a section or one particular thing that stands out – maybe on something I’ve been working on before and felt was lacking something.

The emotions I feel as the protagonist can also be applied to stories. As a writer, I draw upon my own experiences and imagination, so anything that can help broaden that is welcome. By immersing myself in these kinds of games, by giving the character a life through role play techniques, I can then use some of what I experience in stories, regardless of genre. It takes practise but over the years it’s become a handy skill.

You need an imagination

One of the harsher planet's I've found on No Man's Sky - with a weird, flying beast

One of the harsher planet’s I’ve found on No Man’s Sky – with a weird, flying beast

Well, you don’t NEED one, but if you want to use the game as I do, then you kind of do, yeah. My character has a background, a story, a purpose (that sometimes goes against the point of the game but it is so free and vast it doesn’t matter) and I use that. It can change each week.

Sometimes I create one specifically for a project I have in mind, while others are existing characters I transfer to this. It’s a big change for them and that’s a good process to explore. It lets me dive a little deeper into their mind and that, in turn – I hope – makes writing that character a better experience for my readers.

I’m actually doing it with a character right now, but it’s all hush hush. Sorry!

So, despite its shortcomings, I still think No Man’s Sky is a decent game for what it is – and for what I expected it to be…like I said above, not one to follow the crowd for the sake of it. The extra value I get from it won’t work for all writers but maybe for some. Hell, any creative may find it of use in the same way I do.

Then again, there are plenty of ways to find inspiration, if we only remember to open our eyes, ears and other senses to what’s going on around us.

Or, you can read this post and get some other ideas from me!