The East Coast: Cairns and Skydiving

I’m in Cairns! At last! Five weeks this trip has taken me. I’ve seen some amazing things, met some fantastic people and had a few setbacks but that’s normal, right?

Now, being a grumpy old man, I was thankful not to be in a party hostel. It’s a 30-minute walk into town but it’s a nice walk (when it isn’t raining – those tropical storms are a pain!) and the hostel does regular buses through the day and night.

Cairns Lagoon

Cairns Lagoon

I spent some time exploring, and like some stops along the way, Cairns has a lagoon where you can swim and chill. It’s not a good idea to go in the sea cause, you know, crocodiles. I do not fancy being eaten by those things.

Now, here’s one of the biggest highlights of my trip; the skydive.

Yup, the guy who has a fear of heights is going to jump (or be pushed, however you want to say it) out of a plane. I thought I’d be terrified by this point but I was actually pretty calm.

Then I got a phone call the day before. With some bad weather predicted, they wanted me to go early. That’s cool, I figured I’d get picked up at about 8am. That’s fine.

NOPE. Try 5am!

Never in my life, that I remember, have I woken up at 4am before. Been up from the night before? Sure. That’s happened a fair few times.

Oh well, it did mean a sunrise skydive. How cool would that be? The answer is pretty damn cool!

I’ll admit, quite happily, the nerves started kicking in the moment I woke up. I mean, am I seriously going to fall out of a plane at 15,000 feet? It was a tandem skydive, so I was fairly confident of being safe but still, that’s high!

My instructor was cool, and kept me talking throughout, which helped. Other than distracting me until everyone was in the plane. That meant that we’d be the first one out. Shit. Like, SHIT!

(Apologies to anyone reading this not a fan of such language, but it’s the actual thought that I had at that moment. Authenticity, you know?)

Climbing was bad enough. There are two absolutely terrifying points of this experience. The first is when the door opens and you swing your legs out and under the plane. You have to really tuck them under. I can’t remember why but he did tell me. You can feel the wind trying to pull you out. That in itself is scary.

The worst bit, though? How about those first three seconds you leave the plane. I say leave because I didn’t jump, nor did it feel like a push. You have this thought, like “Holy shit, I’ve fallen out of a plane! What do I do? Crap crap crap!”

Help! I'm falling out of a plane!

Help! I’m falling out of a plane!

After that, you settle into it. You relax. You look around. See the sun rising over the clouds, the patterns of the clouds themselves, the ocean, the rainforest, the ground.

The ground!

Right, let me be clear. If you closed your eyes, you wouldn’t know how fast you’re falling. The amount of air hitting you and the resistance it creates does a good job of making you think you’re almost hovering there, like a big fan is holding you up. Open those eyes and you can tell easier you’re falling.

It was such a thrill, and I was allowed to put us in a spin after the parachute was opened. That was fun! I expected jelly legs after landing but, other than my hair being a tangled mess, I was fine. I’d actually do it again! I know what to expect and it was really cool! Not sure I’d ever get to the point I’d jump out myself but who knows?

A few days later, and I’m due to go scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef. All goes well until the boat SETS OFF and then they find out I had asthma as a kid, over 20 years ago. Without a medical certificate, I can’t do it.

The Great Barrier Reef, as seen from the boat

The Great Barrier Reef, as seen from the boat

So, I’m stuck on a boat for 9 hours. Thankfully I took a book. I got a couple of pictures from the boat but it’s not the same. I was offered snorkelling but you have to stay on the surface and people said they couldn’t see much so I passed.  I’m 99% sure I’d have been fine to do it had I known to get one!

The crew were nice about it, though, so I can’t knock them. The photos of others doing it looked awesome. One day, I’ll come back again and do it.

That was a little disappointing but already my attention is shifting. I’m really poor now and I need a job. Time to get one, ideally farm work to help with the second-year visa.

I’ll do a round-up of the whole trip and my thoughts shortly, once that work has been acquired and I can get a stable routine going for a while.

It’s been one hell of a trip, with a few things still left to do. I’m actually really tired, ha! Until next time, people!

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The East Coast: Townsville, Magnetic Island, Mission Beach and Rafting

Less complaining, more enjoying. Now that the Greyhound disaster is done, I can get back to enjoying this trip of mine, right?

Well, mostly.

I’m still suffering from it. The money I lost from not doing the Whitsundays tour and then having to pay for extra accommodation during that time sucks but I’m working on it.

Townsville at night, from Castle Hill

Townsville at night, from Castle Hill

Anyway, realising there isn’t that much to do in Airlie Beach beyond the Whitsundays and drinking, I decided to change my trip and leave a day early. Originally, I was only going to be in Townsville for a little while, either side of my Magnetic Island trip. Instead I decided to spend a night there and see it.

There’s not much there, but I didn’t have time to research it. I found a decent hostel and decided to walk up to Castle Hill for sunset. Only, I was a little late and before I was even half way up it was dark. That didn’t stop me – but it did make me realise how much fitness I’d lost! When I’m settled somewhere, I’ll work on that again.

The views were great, and probably would have been better in daylight but time was going to stop me doing that again. I sat and watched the lights from all around the viewpoint before walking down in even less light.

What did we do before our phones had torches?! Then again, I wasn’t the only one doing it, so maybe it wasn’t that foolish a decision. You decide.

Koala Kuddle!

Koala Kuddle!

The next day, it was off to Magnetic Island for two nights. I was staying in the YHA, which also includes a Koala Sanctuary. I did the tour that day with a friend (who I swear is following me up from Byron Bay!) and I held lizards, birds and got a koala cuddle!

My word, they are the most cuddly things ever, for the few seconds I was allowed to hold it. It didn’t want to let me go, either!

We then did the Fort Walk where we got some amazing views of the island and saw a couple of wild koalas on the way back. That made it a good day.

The next day, I walked around the island a little, went to a few beaches and lookout points, like Arthur Beach and Alma Bay, with a big hill walk in between. I know I ask this a lot, but WHY do I walk up big hills in the heat? I feel like I’m trying to kill myself.

Also, take a lot of water. I keep forgetting that.

It’s worth noting that this hostel had the comfiest beds I’ve been in since leaving home back in January. I slept like a baby both nights. Other hostels; take note!

Then it was another bus to Mission Beach. I didn’t see any of it, except the Woolworths and my hostel, as it was dark by the time I arrived and I had to be up the next morning for Xtreme Rafting.

Or so I thought.

Unfortunately, the Xtreme Rafting didn’t have enough people so I was offered the normal full day rafting instead. I was a little disappointed but they were still going to take me to Cairns at the end of the day, which was easier than going back to the hostel, getting a bus into town and another bus to Cairns.

We had a great day for it. The sun was blazing down on us, and the river was full, with the power station letting out as much as possible. That meant a good day, according to our guide.

White water rafting in Tully

White water rafting in Tully

I got put at the front with the only other guy on the boat. It was tricky at times keeping in synch with each other but we got there. Every time we were told we could jump in the water, I did. I enjoyed floating down through the current. It also helped stave off the cold water somewhat, but the heat was so strong that we dried off pretty quickly. There were squeals as cold water hit us. I was not immune.

It was a little stop and start at times, as we had to make sure every boat got through each section safely. I ended up being the one to hold us in place more than a couple of times. Did I mention how unfit I am now? It was made even clearer here.

We were the only boat not to have anyone fall in – unintentionally, I should add. Every other boat had rafters, or even an instructor, fall in at some point. There’s a point where we all fell in after a short drop, but that was planned. A very good way to wake up. The lunch was also great!

Then it was off to Cairns, where I slept soundly, with a fair few things to do over the next week – including a skydive!